Building Flintlocks

Mark from MA

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Anyone into this?

Im hunting PA next year with my son and need a flintlock. I have some skills in woodworking and am willing to do a kit. But I didn't want a lower end one, and wanted a full length stock. Most of the Traditions or lower end kits don't have that.

I like the Pedersoli Scout Carbine alot, its middle of the road....

Any of you guys get into this? Which suppliers do you use?

I'm kinda surprised by the cost of these things Ive looked at Tennessee Valley and some others....they get pretty pricey, and for my first one, not sure if I want to go all in like that.
 

RoterTeufel

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[popcorn]

Always been interested in black powder. Something really nostalgic about a flintlock rifle. PITA part is the 2 different powders, and flash from the pan. Also keeping your powder dry.

One episode of MeatEater (s.10 e.4) highlights the difficulties of hunting with this type of setup.

 

Picton

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I’d love to make one of these.

What I’m thinking, though, is that “I have some skills in woodworking” and “wanted a full length stock. Most of the Traditions or lower end kits don't have that” are not compatible statements.

Get whatever kit you like, then make the stock to fit? You could use the non-full-length kit stock to trace the butt and the inset locations onto a nice stick of tiger maple, extend the fore-end to your satisfaction, then pull out your spokeshaves and go to town!
 

MAPMFF.

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Anyone into this?

Im hunting PA next year with my son and need a flintlock. I have some skills in woodworking and am willing to do a kit. But I didn't want a lower end one, and wanted a full length stock. Most of the Traditions or lower end kits don't have that.

I like the Pedersoli Scout Carbine alot, its middle of the road....

Any of you guys get into this? Which suppliers do you use?

I'm kinda surprised by the cost of these things Ive looked at Tennessee Valley and some others....they get pretty pricey, and for my first one, not sure if I want to go all in like that.

Track of the Wolf, The Rifle Shoppe has tons of stuff. However not to detract from our great forum on NES but www.muzzleloadingforum.com is where you want to be for this kind of question.
 
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Anyone into this?

Im hunting PA next year with my son and need a flintlock. I have some skills in woodworking and am willing to do a kit. But I didn't want a lower end one, and wanted a full length stock. Most of the Traditions or lower end kits don't have that.

I like the Pedersoli Scout Carbine alot, its middle of the road....

Any of you guys get into this? Which suppliers do you use?

I'm kinda surprised by the cost of these things Ive looked at Tennessee Valley and some others....they get pretty pricey, and for my first one, not sure if I want to go all in like that.
Back in the 80s and early 90s we ordered all sorts of muzzle loader kits and black powder pistols from cabela’s , what ever was on sale . Most where lower end kits and we would not get much life from them.

The higher end kits will give you years of use. As with most things the more specific YOU want something the MORE its going to cost.

My friends dad did one of these back in 2020 when he was stuck home.
I think he went with a semi fancy maple stock its not the heavy “tiger stripped” style . Still has some cool swirls and burly look . Hes a wood finisher and used all sorts of concoctions to bring out the grain.
 
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Mark from MA

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I’d love to make one of these.

What I’m thinking, though, is that “I have some skills in woodworking” and “wanted a full length stock. Most of the Traditions or lower end kits don't have that” are not compatible statements.

Get whatever kit you like, then make the stock to fit? You could use the non-full-length kit stock to trace the butt and the inset locations onto a nice stick of tiger maple, extend the fore-end to your satisfaction, then pull out your spokeshaves and go to town!
While I have some time.....I don't have time to make a custom stock, and inlet a barrel, router out a lock holes, , etc. That is considered major work. Nor do I want to take the time, aquire the special tools either. Plus if I go with a 200 dollar piece of curly maple is best left with most of the inletting and barrel fitting done by CNC.

I don't mind doing the final finishing and some minor fitting, but I want most of the work done as I do work for a living.

I think my dilemma here is a good kit is like 700 dollars. I'm questioning if I could actually just find a good used one at that price.
 

Picton

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While I have some time.....I don't have time to make a custom stock, and inlet a barrel, router out a lock holes, , etc. That is considered major work. Nor do I want to take the time, aquire the special tools either. Plus if I go with a 200 dollar piece of curly maple is best left with most of the inletting and barrel fitting done by CNC.

I don't mind doing the final finishing and some minor fitting, but I want most of the work done as I do work for a living.

I think my dilemma here is a good kit is like 700 dollars. I'm questioning if I could actually just find a good used one at that price.
I hear you.
 
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While I have some time.....I don't have time to make a custom stock, and inlet a barrel, router out a lock holes, , etc. That is considered major work. Nor do I want to take the time, aquire the special tools either. Plus if I go with a 200 dollar piece of curly maple is best left with most of the inletting and barrel fitting done by CNC.

I don't mind doing the final finishing and some minor fitting, but I want most of the work done as I do work for a living.

I think my dilemma here is a good kit is like 700 dollars. I'm questioning if I could actually just find a good used one at that price.

Good kits are $700-$1,200. Like most things, you get what you pay for, but whether the juice is worth the squeeze is entirely up to you and what you want out of the experience. I like to finish my kits as period correct as possible, barrel browning, natural materials to stain and finish the stock etc.

If your just wanting to fart around with BP for shits and giggles, the nicer kits might not make sense. But what your getting with those kits are better, more attractive wood, better fitment of parts, better locks, nicer triggers, better detail.

With Kibler, you can have them do all the major fitment of parts and do all the "gunsmithing" that requires a little bit of research and study before you attempt them, lest you screw up and have to send it back to them to fix or take it to a smith, resulting in down time.

Its all very doable, provided you weren't trained by Century Arms, can understand instructions, and have a modicum of knowledge about tools.

In the end, if you go with the nice kit, take your time to do it correctly, don't rush it or settle, you'll have an amazing piece you can be proud of and proud to show it off. They're special.
 

Mark from MA

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Good kits are $700-$1,200. Like most things, you get what you pay for, but whether the juice is worth the squeeze is entirely up to you and what you want out of the experience. I like to finish my kits as period correct as possible, barrel browning, natural materials to stain and finish the stock etc.

If your just wanting to fart around with BP for shits and giggles, the nicer kits might not make sense. But what your getting with those kits are better, more attractive wood, better fitment of parts, better locks, nicer triggers, better detail.

With Kibler, you can have them do all the major fitment of parts and do all the "gunsmithing" that requires a little bit of research and study before you attempt them, lest you screw up and have to send it back to them to fix or take it to a smith, resulting in down time.

Its all very doable, provided you weren't trained by Century Arms, can understand instructions, and have a modicum of knowledge about tools.

In the end, if you go with the nice kit, take your time to do it correctly, don't rush it or settle, you'll have an amazing piece you can be proud of and proud to show it off. They're special.
I think that's what I need to decide......I do not see myself getting heavy into this. Though I do appreciate the beauty of period type guns.
 
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I think that's what I need to decide......I do not see myself getting heavy into this. Though I do appreciate the beauty of period type guns.
I don't think anyone ever regretted purchasing a quality firearm, but like you said, its entirely up to you. FWIW, there's a market for them if you decided to get rid of it. A lot of folks would jump on a built Kibler vs waiting for one and it being properly and nicely finished. Additionally, when in shortages and whatever panic is going on, BP supplies are usually plentiful and affordable, and its not hard to stock up on them.

I got more into BP shooting, just fun and relaxing. I can make a lot of my own supplies, lube, patches, cleaning solutions, lead balls, conicals, knapped flint. Theres even recipes and videos for making your own powder, lots of guys do it.

Just kicking it out there.
 
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