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GREAT WEBSITE FOR MORSE CODE PRACTICE - http://aa9pw.com/morsecode/

aeromarine

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Just in case this has not yet been posted the attached link provides a great site for learning code and building speed. You can define the "speed" and "pacing" to create a flexible Farnsworth regime based on your current skill levels and target goals. I learned basic code over 40 years ago in training for the Navy and Merchant Marine. That knowledge is still there but just a little rusty. However, after a handful of review sessions using the link shown below it has dramatically increased my speed.

Code is a great skill to have and it can really come in handy when needed. You don't require a radio either. A good flash light, car horn, boat horn, etc. can always be used in a pinch. It may even save you life!

Just another example of one of the important skill sets (like first aid, wilderness training, living off the land) that many of us learned as kids (in Boy Scouts) that can come in handy during a life-or- death survival situation. Few people seem to know these things any more. Rather, they simply rely on the "Nanny State" to take care of them when things like Katrina happen. It is a terrible tragedy to see our country decaying from within like this!

http://aa9pw.com/morsecode/
 
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Bob J

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I originally learned my code in Boy Scouts as well but that was seriously many moons ago..... I am currently using G4FON's Koch trainer which so far seems to be pretty efficient....

http://www.g4fon.net/

Bob J
KB1TRE
 

KBCraig

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Do any of you CW guys use a bug, or just a traditional key?

My father and grandfather were both railroad telegraphers, and when the old telegrah equipment was torn out and taken to storage, certain friends made sure it went right on out the back door, then it found its way to our house. There are keys, bugs, and sounders, all sitting on the same rolltop desk my grandfather used as an agent.
 
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Thanks for the link as well! I took a practice technician exam for the heck of it. I squeaked by, not bad considering I know next to nothing :)
 
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Do any of you CW guys use a bug, or just a traditional key?

My father and grandfather were both railroad telegraphers, and when the old telegrah equipment was torn out and taken to storage, certain friends made sure it went right on out the back door, then it found its way to our house. There are keys, bugs, and sounders, all sitting on the same rolltop desk my grandfather used as an agent.


Oh, that's cool! My grandfather also worked for the railroad in WV and OH. Any pics of the gear?
 
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Wow, how did I miss this post. Yes, pics, please!!

I was never any good with a bug, but I've been meaning to give a sideswiper a try for awhile:

 
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KBCraig

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Oh, that's cool! My grandfather also worked for the railroad in WV and OH. Any pics of the gear?
No, it's at my mother's house. If I can remember, I'll try to get some pics sometime.

I've always regretted not learning code, but railroad morse wouldn't do me much good these days. Dad said that when two operators who knew each other were working, they would routinely top 70wpm, thanks to a lot of specialized shorthand.

There was a miniature tourist railroad near us, and the owner had Dad record a tape for him, which he played on continuous loop. When the riders pulled up in front of the depot, the hams would cock their ears, then shake their heads. The railroaders would cock their ears, then bust out laughing. Railroaders are a notoriously profane bunch, and there was a lot of double entendre on that tape. ;-)
 
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For those interested here is information about American (rail road) Morse:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Morse_code

If you scroll down a bit, there is a table that compares American with International. Note that Hams use International Morse. Keep in mind when looking at the American Morse table that a lot of the '_'s indicate a space in the middle of a character (see footnote 2).
 
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