Gunsmith recommendations for an old Marlin?

TheGreekFreak

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Bought a Marlin 39A Mountie a while back. From the serial number, it was made sometime in the 50s. Looked to be in excellent condition, at least cosmetically.

But of course, first trip to the range, click and nothing. Had problems ejecting rounds too.

Any recommendations for a good gunsmith for an old little .22LR lever action like this? Preferably near Boston but willing to drive a bit if he's some Marlin super geek wizard.
 
Bought a Marlin 39A Mountie a while back. From the serial number, it was made sometime in the 50s. Looked to be in excellent condition, at least cosmetically.

But of course, first trip to the range, click and nothing. Had problems ejecting rounds too.

Any recommendations for a good gunsmith for an old little .22LR lever action like this? Preferably near Boston but willing to drive a bit if he's some Marlin super geek wizard.
Before you take it to a smith , clean the living crap out of it and use a dental pick in all the nooks a crannies .
Back then it was common to use the old gun grease and over time it will harden up and gum up everything.
I took an shotgun apart that belonged to my brother in laws dad.
The stuff was caked in the receiver rails so bad it was like pulling out a shoe lace.
 
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Bought a Marlin 39A Mountie a while back. From the serial number, it was made sometime in the 50s. Looked to be in excellent condition, at least cosmetically.

But of course, first trip to the range, click and nothing. Had problems ejecting rounds too.

Any recommendations for a good gunsmith for an old little .22LR lever action like this? Preferably near Boston but willing to drive a bit if he's some Marlin super geek wizard.
It’s junk. I’ll give you $200

That being said my guess is that the old girl was dry fired too many times. Firing pin peened a tit at 12” on the chamber mouth.

Then the firing pin broke off from said dry firing.

Now you cycle a cartridge. It won’t fire because there’s no pin, and it won’t extract because that little tit is pressing into the side of the brass, holding it into the chamber.

Remove the bolt and check for a firing pin.
 
Bought a Marlin 39A Mountie a while back. From the serial number, it was made sometime in the 50s. Looked to be in excellent condition, at least cosmetically.

But of course, first trip to the range, click and nothing. Had problems ejecting rounds too.

Any recommendations for a good gunsmith for an old little .22LR lever action like this? Preferably near Boston but willing to drive a bit if he's some Marlin super geek wizard.
Bring it to Northeast arms in Peabody. @sschevy
 
Thanks for all the recommendations gentlemen! Swamped at work this week and so scatter brained that I forgot to check for updates….can you see why it’s been waiting to be fixed for months [laugh]

If not too personal, what did you pay for it?

I honestly way overpaid for it, just because of how nice it was cosmetically compared to others I was seeing. It looks like a lightly used 60+ year old gun, just clearly doesn’t work like one lol

Believe I paid $725 for it? Granted, it seems like mountie models go for more than regular 39As and I wanted a minimally blemished mountie model.
 
Probably a broken or missing firing pin combined with a peened chamber from too much dry firing. Replacing a firing pin is easy. There's not much that can be done for the latter short of replacing the barrel (or cutting it back, rethreading and rechambering, but that'll kill its collector value and probably cost you close to what you paid for the gun.) This is why everyone harps on not dry firing rimfire guns.
 
Probably a broken or missing firing pin combined with a peened chamber from too much dry firing. Replacing a firing pin is easy. There's not much that can be done for the latter short of replacing the barrel (or cutting it back, rethreading and rechambering, but that'll kill its collector value and probably cost you close to what you paid for the gun.) This is why everyone harps on not dry firing rimfire guns.
I was taught not to or should I say refrain from dry firing rim fire guns as it can make a mess.
 
Probably a broken or missing firing pin combined with a peened chamber from too much dry firing. Replacing a firing pin is easy. There's not much that can be done for the latter short of replacing the barrel (or cutting it back, rethreading and rechambering, but that'll kill its collector value and probably cost you close to what you paid for the gun.) This is why everyone harps on not dry firing rimfire guns.
He can look into a chamber iron.
 
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