Market in the toilet who’s buying?

Ron Jablonski

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It will be fine. Average down, pick some stocks on sale you are willing to hold for 3+ years and in the future you will look at this as the opportunity you had been waiting for the past 10 years.

When this recovers, you won't get another chance like this for another decade or so, or until we f*ck ourselves over again.
Agreed, I feel like what we're seeing is just people that made a lot of money the last two years panicking and cashing out. We're not heading into a crash yet, just a correction.
 

Woodsloafer

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Agreed, I feel like what we're seeing is just people that made a lot of money the last two years panicking and cashing out. We're not heading into a crash yet, just a correction.

I disagree, there are too many headwinds, the energy cost increases are just starting to work their way through supply chain cost increases and have impacts on revenue, never mind the increases in everything else. If fuel/heating costs remain this high or go higher by next heating season there is going to be a true reckoning. Even in the next few months, based on low and decreasing inventories, there could be diesel fuel shortages and rationing in New England states and other areas on the east coast. Also, electrical utility companies are talking about additional 25-40% increases in the coming months on top of significant increases over the past few months. Then you have the housing market which is just beginning to show signs of a slow down (huge drop in mortgage applications), if it continues to drop there will be additional impacts which will have major repercussions throughout the economy. You need good/regular economic news for the stock markets to rebound, there is and will be none for who knows how long in my opinion.

Plus, there is the debt of more than $30 trillion, likely to be more than $40 trillion by the end of 2023, especially with the interest rate increases. In five years it will be $50-$60 trillion, there is no way the government can control spending and it will have to borrow more and more each year and the interest payments alone, for which more money will have to be borrowed to pay, will snowball at an unbelievable rate. Even Biden's budget projections through 2030 shows a total of $24 trillion in deficits for just the regular annual budgets, this does not include all the stimulus, assistance, etc. programs that you know they will pass and borrow for, by 2030 the debt will likely be $80-$100 trillion.
 
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Mark from MA

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I’m too old for this much excitement.
If your old, there is no way you should be in this market. You should have pulled when shithead became president.

Hell, I'm 53 and I pulled out 1/3 of it, and its proved to be a good move so far.......I wish I pulled even more.

The only money I put in was for oil. Which has been a good move but now its getting out of control.......

Fed won't care if the Dow goes down to 20K if inflation isn't in control. Until Oil goes down every day....that's not going to happen easily.
 

Mark from MA

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I disagree, there are too many headwinds, the energy cost increases are just starting to work their way through supply chain cost increases and have impacts on revenue, never mind the increases in everything else. If fuel/heating costs remain this high or go higher by next heating season there is going to be a true reckoning. Even in the next few months, based on low and decreasing inventories, there could be diesel fuel shortages and rationing in New England states and other areas on the east coast. Also, electrical utility companies are talking about additional 25-40% increases in the coming months on top of significant increases over the past few months. Then you have the housing market which is just beginning to show signs of a slow down (huge drop in mortgage applications), if it continues to drop there will be additional impacts which will have major repercussions throughout the economy. You need good/regular economic news for the stock markets to rebound, there is and will be none for who knows how long in my opinion.

Plus, there is the debt of more than $30 trillion, likely to be more than $40 trillion by the end of 2023, especially with the interest rate increases. In five years it will be $50-$60 trillion, there is no way the government can control spending and it will have to borrow more and more each year and the interest payments alone, for which more money will have to be borrowed to pay, will snowball at an unbelievable rate. Even Biden's budget projections through 2030 shows a total of $24 trillion in deficits for just the regular annual budgets, this does not include all the stimulus, assistance, etc. programs that you know they will pass and borrow for, by 2030 the debt will likely be $80-$100 trillion.
Well said.

The top paragraph states why I really need to get the fxck out of here. Housing in the northeast could be worth shxt if you can't get heating oil/or it goes up beyond retard...which its half way there now. Added to that electricity goes full retard. Mass exodus!
 

Varmint

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I disagree, there are too many headwinds, the energy cost increases are just starting to work their way through supply chain cost increases and have impacts on revenue, never mind the increases in everything else. If fuel/heating costs remain this high or go higher by next heating season there is going to be a true reckoning. Even in the next few months, based on low and decreasing inventories, there could be diesel fuel shortages and rationing in New England states and other areas on the east coast. Also, electrical utility companies are talking about additional 25-40% increases in the coming months on top of significant increases over the past few months. Then you have the housing market which is just beginning to show signs of a slow down (huge drop in mortgage applications), if it continues to drop there will be additional impacts which will have major repercussions throughout the economy. You need good/regular economic news for the stock markets to rebound, there is and will be none for who knows how long in my opinion.

Plus, there is the debt of more than $30 trillion, likely to be more than $40 trillion by the end of 2023, especially with the interest rate increases. In five years it will be $50-$60 trillion, there is no way the government can control spending and it will have to borrow more and more each year and the interest payments alone, for which more money will have to be borrowed to pay, will snowball at an unbelievable rate. Even Biden's budget projections through 2030 shows a total of $24 trillion in deficits for just the regular annual budgets, this does not include all the stimulus, assistance, etc. programs that you know they will pass and borrow for, by 2030 the debt will likely be $80-$100 trillion.

You don’t need good news for a rebound, you just have to run out of sellers. Bear markets have the biggest rallies as there’s no more sellers and traders start buying, triggering massive short covering. I’m expecting that soon.
 

Mark from MA

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You don’t need good news for a rebound, you just have to run out of sellers. Bear markets have the biggest rallies as there’s no more sellers and traders start buying, triggering massive short covering. I’m expecting that soon.
Boomers are selling if they are smart or have sold off.....so you may be right.

I do think there is a large block of millenials that must invest in the stock market to beat inflationary prices on everything. And they are somewhat forced to with their 401K.
So that is somewhat positive.

Whether we will be in a recession next year.........is another question.
 

45Badger

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If your old, there is no way you should be in this market. You should have pulled when shithead became president.

Hell, I'm 53 and I pulled out 1/3 of it, and its proved to be a good move so far.......I wish I pulled even more.

The only money I put in was for oil. Which has been a good move but now its getting out of control.......

Fed won't care if the Dow goes down to 20K if inflation isn't in control. Until Oil goes down every day....that's not going to happen easily.
I’m 60 and my wife is 57. I’m in reasonably good health and she is insanely fit. Family genetics suggest she will probably live forever. Math says we probably can’t sit on cash and maintain lifestyle.

We are pretty diversified and conservatively deployed, with five years cash expenses in the bank. So far, I think we’re down a bit less than 10%. That still stinks in real $$.
 

Woodsloafer

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You don’t need good news for a rebound, you just have to run out of sellers. Bear markets have the biggest rallies as there’s no more sellers and traders start buying, triggering massive short covering. I’m expecting that soon.

I'm expecting us to be like Japan after their bubble burst when they raised interest rates to try to get inflation under control, some ups and downs but stocks generally languishing for years.

And we haven’t even begun to see the full impacts of higher fuel/energy costs in food, materials, goods, transportation, etc. Prices will have to increase even more to compensate. Farmers are just getting underway on their crops, etc. for this growing season and all will have to increase prices due to fuel cost increases. We are entering a viscious cycle in uncharted waters.
 
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Mark from MA

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I'm expecting us to be like Japan after their bubble burst when they raised interest rates to try to get inflation under control, some ups and downs but stocks generally languishing for years.

And we haven’t even begun to see the full impacts of higher fuel/energy costs in food, materials, goods, transportation, etc. Prices will have to increase even more to compensate. Farmers are just getting underway on their crops, etc. for this growing season and all will have to increase prices due to fuel cost increases. We are entering a viscious cycle in uncharted waters.

Its tough to compare us to Japan....we have raw materials, we have illegal and legal immigration, and that alone will help keep stocks up.

Japan is an island of old people not having kids and limited immigration. They are slowly dying without an influx of people.

That said...even with immigration our birth rate is declining.......though, i think illegal immigration will make up for that, or level it off.
 

Mark from MA

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I’m 60 and my wife is 57. I’m in reasonably good health and she is insanely fit. Family genetics suggest she will probably live forever. Math says we probably can’t sit on cash and maintain lifestyle.

We are pretty diversified and conservatively deployed, with five years cash expenses in the bank. So far, I think we’re down a bit less than 10%. That still stinks in real $$.
That's not exactly old......I meant like retired already....or at least 65...........10% isn't bad.....most of us that are into stocks are 20 and 30% down from last year. I also don't intend to leave that 1/3 in cash either. It will be spent up at some point, but I don't think we are near lows yet, especially if we are in recession mode. This one could be as bad or worse than 2008. In which the Dow was cut in half from 13K or so to 6K. if I remember right, as even though I was younger back then I still pulled 1/4 of the stocks out at the highs when oil and housing were stupid high in 2007. I started buying back in when the dow was at 7K, right before the market bottomed.

I mean financial advisors are right....young people can hold onto it............but why lose all of it at the top when you know things are stupid high, and there is for certain a drop coming.
Your not much of a financial advisor if you are just telling people to hold and lose it all rather than sell, sit on cash for a while and buy back lower.....WTF!

People in their 50's and 60's have to be much more tactical when it comes to this....can't just sit on it and lose half of it hoping it comes back in a year.......this market could go bear for 5 years for we know.
 

Varmint

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I'm expecting us to be like Japan after their bubble burst when they raised interest rates to try to get inflation under control, some ups and downs but stocks generally languishing for years.

And we haven’t even begun to see the full impacts of higher fuel/energy costs in food, materials, goods, transportation, etc. Prices will have to increase even more to compensate. Farmers are just getting underway on their crops, etc. for this growing season and all will have to increase prices due to fuel cost increases. We are entering a viscious cycle in uncharted waters.

You're thinking past the next month. I think we get a short term rally and in a month or two, new lows until the Fed gets scared and gives up on tightening. Then things get real interesting.
 

Varmint

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That's not exactly old......I meant like retired already....or at least 65...........10% isn't bad.....most of us that are into stocks are 20 and 30% down from last year. I also don't intend to leave that 1/3 in cash either. It will be spent up at some point, but I don't think we are near lows yet, especially if we are in recession mode. This one could be as bad or worse than 2008. In which the Dow was cut in half from 13K or so to 6K. if I remember right, as even though I was younger back then I still pulled 1/4 of the stocks out at the highs when oil and housing were stupid high in 2007. I started buying back in when the dow was at 7K, right before the market bottomed.

I mean financial advisors are right....young people can hold onto it............but why lose all of it at the top when you know things are stupid high, and there is for certain a drop coming.
Your not much of a financial advisor if you are just telling people to hold and lose it all rather than sell, sit on cash for a while and buy back lower.....WTF!

People in their 50's and 60's have to be much more tactical when it comes to this....can't just sit on it and lose half of it hoping it comes back in a year.......this market could go bear for 5 years for we know.

It's brutal for older or retired people.
Your choices are:
Stay in cash = -8%/year
Buy bonds, make 2% - 8% = -6%year
Buy bond funds = -20% - 8% = -28%/year
Buy stocks = ? - 8% = ?
 

Broccoli Iglesias

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I’m curious about this bloke. He’s always the sad face of red CNBC market headlines. We all feel like him.
View attachment 617680
I never understood what these dudes on the floor do. Everything is electronic now, are they just there because of tradition?

I know what they actually do, I just don't understand why they are there.
 
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