More police protecting and serving

MisterHappy

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On the 16 yard line, shootin' for the Lewis!
This stuff is tiring after awhile!!! Sad. I wonder how many NES people would actually be okay with getting rid of qualified immunity...
You're right. It IS tiring, after a while. The real problem is that it's been going along for decades, and more. It's just that now, with beveryone having a camera, it gets caught, and publicized.

It's not just the cops, today, are being bad, and getting caught - it's that policies that are generations old are being taken away, and they're not happy. Kind of like Hildebeast's supporters' butthurt when Trump won - it was not just that T won, but that H was "known" to be the next President, and that was taken away.
 

Rob Boudrie

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From the article cited:

"I have been doing this job for 36 years. I've had drunk Indians drive down my cul-de-sac. I've had drunk Indians come to my door," he said. "I live just off the reservation, we have a lot of reservation people around us who are not good people."

This Sheriff just redefined stepping on one's dick.
 

allen-1

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From the article cited:
"I have been doing this job for 36 years. I've had drunk Indians drive down my cul-de-sac. I've had drunk Indians come to my door," he said. "I live just off the reservation, we have a lot of reservation people around us who are not good people."

This Sheriff just redefined stepping on one's dick.
with golf shoes on.
 

appraiser

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drgrant

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Rowland said he had had one alcoholic drink earlier in the night, but was not drunk or impaired.

"I had all of my facilities with me, I was clear as a freakin bell," he told investigators.

Lol probably 110% lie, because he knew by the time he got pinged nobody could prove he was shattered. Stereotypical angry drunk whining about meddling kids.
 
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Lol probably 110% lie, because he knew by the time he got pinged nobody could prove he was shattered. Stereotypical angry drunk whining about meddling kids.

Does him being sober and acting that way help over him being drunk? I think acting like a deranged lunatic while sober seems a lot worse than being an idiot when drunk. You can get someone who has substance abuse issues help...
 

Rob Boudrie

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42!

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Do police not have any hiring standards or is it just that the hiring standards include them being a convicted criminal?


View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Stwz65az1yk

They have standards, they just don't care. Framingham Police Lt Harry Wareham (former Licensing Officer), has a violent criminal history from before joining the PD that makes him Fed PP and State Disqualified and yet he not only was hired, and promoted to Lt, he was until recently the LO. I've heard second hand the state has restored his rights, but as we know the Fed does not recognize that. He continues to server and has never suffered any repercussions for his actions.
 

Rob Boudrie

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They have standards, they just don't care. Framingham Police Lt Harry Wareham (former Licensing Officer), has a violent criminal history from before joining the PD that makes him Fed PP and State Disqualified and yet he not only was hired, and promoted to Lt, he was until recently the LO. I've heard second hand the state has restored his rights, but as we know the Fed does not recognize that. He continues to server and has never suffered any repercussions for his actions.
Officer Duncan should be very grateful the "ooops..." defense works for LEOs in MA.
 

42!

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That’s the same thing as not having standards.
If you think about it it's worse. They take the time and effort to establish standards. Put them in writing. Release them to the public and promote themselves as virtuous based on their standards.

Then they don't care and don't follow them.
 

MaverickNH

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Old article about a new law that takes effect 1 Jan 2022. Too bad it doesn’t apply to adults too…

"This week, Illinois became the first state in the nation to make it illegal for police officers to lie to children during interrogations. The new law signed this week by Democratic Gov. J.B. Pritzker aims to prevent interrogators from using fake information to obtain confessions from minors.

The bill would block police officers from making up evidence to entice a confession when interviewing minors, or from providing them false promises about leniency. The bill passed the state legislature with near unanimous support in votes held in April and May. Oregon and New York are considering similar bills.

Thirty-one of the 100 people exonerated in Illinois over the past three decades due to false confessions have been minors, according to the Innocence Project."

Said WaPo: "Using deceptive tactics during interrogations is generally permitted in the United States. But the practice often leads to false confessions, experts say. Minors, who some studies show are two to three times as likely to give a false confession as adults, are particularly vulnerable…the United States, unlike many other liberal democracies, has a “long tradition of favoring interrogation tactics that are designed to trick people into confessing."
 

SKumar

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Can someone name me any other profession that tolerates (and sometimes encourages) corruption, rights violations, criminal acts, and domestic terrorism? If I saw any healthcare professional doing criminal acts, you think I'll sit there and say "well thats on him, he's got nothing to do with me."? You think I'll lie, deny, and intentionally cover up for intentional harm being brought onto the public?

Law enforcement is a sacred professional whose authority has been abused to shit. Its sad that what once was a noble profession is now considered enemy at large.

Illinois became the first state in the nation to make it illegal for police officers to lie to children during interrogations.
This won't have any effect. The word "lie" is vague and subjective. Minors won't know if cops lie or not, and frankly, cops themselves don't know if they lie or not (nor do they care).

Furthermore, it makes it apparent that lying to adults (even during interrogation) is fully legal. I have no doubt that cops won't put away that tool anytime soon.
 

bigbravehog

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Can someone name me any other profession that tolerates (and sometimes encourages) corruption, rights violations, criminal acts, and domestic terrorism? If I saw any healthcare professional doing criminal acts, you think I'll sit there and say "well thats on him, he's got nothing to do with me."? You think I'll lie, deny, and intentionally cover up for intentional harm being brought onto the public?

Law enforcement is a sacred professional whose authority has been abused to shit. Its sad that what once was a noble profession is now considered enemy at large.


This won't have any effect. The word "lie" is vague and subjective. Minors won't know if cops lie or not, and frankly, cops themselves don't know if they lie or not (nor do they care).

Furthermore, it makes it apparent that lying to adults (even during interrogation) is fully legal. I have no doubt that cops won't put away that tool anytime soon.
"Can someone name me any other profession that tolerates (and sometimes encourages) corruption, rights violations, criminal acts, and domestic terrorism?" - politicians
 

Rob Boudrie

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Can someone name me any other profession that tolerates (and sometimes encourages) corruption, rights violations, criminal acts, and domestic terrorism? If I saw any healthcare professional doing criminal acts, you think I'll sit there and say "well thats on him, he's got nothing to do with me."? You think I'll lie, deny, and intentionally cover up for intentional harm being brought onto the public?
Health care is not a good example for accountability. Talking about acts that are not criminal, but erroneous and cause patient harm.

Do MD's tell patients things like "A medical error caused your injury" or just treat the injury to the best of their ability after it occurs? Will an MD turn stool and rat out a co-worker is a competent practitioner and makes a serious, but honest mistake? I'm not talking about speaking up because an MD is generally incompetent, but an otherwise excellent one who makes a once in a lifetime sort of error, like the cop with the taserglock.

Do hospitals hide behind a law making internal "Safety reports" that discuss specific patient incidents discussing errors or lack of proper safety procedures immune from the civil discovery process, or do they voluntarily provide these reports the patient in the interest of accountability?

And what about the "just culture" concept in medicine? The concept is to "balance accountability and patient safety", with an emphasis on "fixing the process, not nailing the individual who made the mistake" (see https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3776518/). It cites the example of "counselling and supporting rather than punishing" a nurse who grabs the wrong drug because the vials looks similar.

As an MD, if you knew a surgeon you worked with had to take the patient back to the OR because a sponge was unaccounted for, and that MD did not tell the patient the reason other than "we needed to do a bit more work", would you tell the patient about the incident; file a protected from discovery safety report; or do nothing knowing the surgeon was very competent and this was an unusual mistake. Consider this under the cloud of the surgeon being a department head with influence on your career.

---------

Now, compare this to a couple of professions in which accountability rules:

Aviation - if there is an accident, it is investigated, and fault assessed if there was pilot error. None of this "No punitive action, the fuel gage window was dirty, we will counsel and support him/her". In the words of one ATP (Air Transport Pilot) at the local gun club, "bend metal and that's it".

Military - Did Commander Waddle get counseling, rather than punishment, when the sub under his command took out that Japanese fishing boat? When bad shit happens on your watch as a military officer that "lack of confidence in your leadership" comes into play and you drive a desk until an early retirement.
 

42!

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Health care is not a good example for accountability. Talking about acts that are not criminal, but erroneous and cause patient harm.

Do MD's tell patients things like "A medical error caused your injury" or just treat the injury to the best of their ability after it occurs? Will an MD turn stool and rat out a co-worker is a competent practitioner and makes a serious, but honest mistake? I'm not talking about speaking up because an MD is generally incompetent, but an otherwise excellent one who makes a once in a lifetime sort of error, like the cop with the taserglock.

Do hospitals hide behind a law making internal "Safety reports" that discuss specific patient incidents discussing errors or lack of proper safety procedures immune from the civil discovery process, or do they voluntarily provide these reports the patient in the interest of accountability?

And what about the "just culture" concept in medicine? The concept is to "balance accountability and patient safety", with an emphasis on "fixing the process, not nailing the individual who made the mistake" (see https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3776518/). It cites the example of "counselling and supporting rather than punishing" a nurse who grabs the wrong drug because the vials looks similar.

As an MD, if you knew a surgeon you worked with had to take the patient back to the OR because a sponge was unaccounted for, and that MD did not tell the patient the reason other than "we needed to do a bit more work", would you tell the patient about the incident; file a protected from discovery safety report; or do nothing knowing the surgeon was very competent and this was an unusual mistake. Consider this under the cloud of the surgeon being a department head with influence on your career.

---------

Now, compare this to a couple of professions in which accountability rules:

Aviation - if there is an accident, it is investigated, and fault assessed if there was pilot error. None of this "No punitive action, the fuel gage window was dirty, we will counsel and support him/her". In the words of one ATP (Air Transport Pilot) at the local gun club, "bend metal and that's it".

Military - Did Commander Waddle get counseling, rather than punishment, when the sub under his command took out that Japanese fishing boat? When bad shit happens on your watch as a military officer that "lack of confidence in your leadership" comes into play and you drive a desk until an early retirement.
A medical example.
I just went under the knife a second time because the surgeon screwed up, do you think he cares? Or even is held accountable. No, he'll even get paid a second time. Meanwhile I have to go through the whole recovery process a second time, including some seriously painful post op. Not so much as a sorry about that. Acts like he's doing me a favor. The doctor says nothing about the screw up and the only reason I know is because it wasn't working and a RN mentioned that the positioning was incorrect. And for some unknown reason getting the x-rays that would show this is taking repeated requests.

It's all about covering up the mistakes.

Hell, when I was a mechanic at a dealer, if I screwed up a job I had to redo it for free. Docktors can screw up and then get paid to fix it.
 
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