Need a Router - Battery vs Corded

Bladerunner

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Need a router. Am looking at both of these Makita options:

Any input on either or suggestions?Both will get the job done but I'm more inclined to go corded even though I do love my 18v tools.

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I would go cordless myself. Nothing so frustrating as getting the cord caught and having it ruin whatever detail work you are trying to accomplish at the time.
 

MICHAEL GILLETTE

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Some tools I go with corded. Routers are one of those, due to the power needed to spin certain router bits. Should you go cordless, just remember that the minute you put the battery in, the bit will spin if the power switch was inadvertently switched "on".
 

mac1911

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Go with corded, the cordless are good for quick work around the job site or small work like door hinges.
If your looking to use it to machine metal parts , speed control is nice to have and the new fangdangle electronic speed control opptions are good also.
 
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Dennis in MA

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I don't route much b/c they scare the crap out of me. Something about that spinning bit just scares me. It's like a drill on uber-steroids.

As mentioned, for a "normal" sized router - I'd never even consider a cordless. But a small router for mini-jobs - DEFINITELY cordless.

I do so little routing in my life that I don't even own a small cordless router. My small one is corded as well.
 

jayhitek

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Do you have any other Makita tools that use the same battery?

But in my opinion.. I have two routers, both corded.
If you are only doing small jobs, and don't plan on hard woods or lot of hogging out..
Then battery night work for you.
But anything long term.. Corded.

And agreed with above. Routers are the scariest tool to use.
But can do so much with them.
 

mac1911

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Do you have any other Makita tools that use the same battery?

But in my opinion.. I have two routers, both corded.
If you are only doing small jobs, and don't plan on hard woods or lot of hogging out..
Then battery night work for you.
But anything long term.. Corded.

And agreed with above. Routers are the scariest tool to use.
But can do so much with them.
I dont use my router to often its a old ass one. Belonged to my dad. Im much more affraid of the table saw.
Used a Milwaukee cordless to do some trimming of some edge banding .....man that was smooth , easy and quick. Banged out some hinge mortis while I,had it. Perfect for that stuff.
 

citoriguy

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I have both a full size and compact router and both are corded (Bosch). I went that way because most of the time I’m doing edge work on tables or other furniture (or precise cutting of patterns) and I don’t want the thing conking out on me when I’m in the middle of something.

The battery powered routers have come a long way, but I still prefer the corded versions for my applications.
 

CaptDan3

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Small like a trim router for laminate cordless is fine. But for a workhorse like a Ryobi D handle or Delta 2hp and up you want corded power.
And then what about the one you leave upside down attached to the Router table?
Why limit yourself to only one ! Routers are like handguns, "You can never have to many"
 
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