Needed: 2022 Candidates for NH State Rep

design

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There are a number of state rep districts that need candidates. I have a list of openings. If you have every thought about being involved in your 'spare' time as a state rep in NH, please PM me.
 

42!

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You have no idea how badly I want to do this, I've said this since I moved to NH but the time commitment just isn't going to work. My work schedule is already messed up due to recent health problems and the time I would need to be a rep just isn't going to happen while I'm still working.

Why am I saying all this? Because I'm sorry I can't do this, and I feel guilty that I can't keep with what I said I would do 4 years ago.

@design maybe you should post that list? either way send it to me, maybe I can help find people who may have more time.
 

42!

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You can bet that if we fill the legislature with younger people they will want to turn it into a paid full-time job.
One of the reasons the legislature is older people is because they can take the time to serve where those of less age are, or at least used to be, working hard either in education or an actual job. But with the increasing trend for 18+ to live at home and work part time at best, they now can serve. But they will see it as a full-time job, which it is, and will want to be well paid for it i.e. MA.

I'm ok with some younger people but I want them on record against making it a full-time job. Part of what ruined MA was the professional politician.
 

design

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There must be retired and people with flexible work schedules that can run, we just need to find them.
 

Dench

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There must be retired and people with flexible work schedules that can run, we just need to find them.

This is the exact demographic age wise that is pretty much universally hated. One of the things that is ubiquitous is people sick and tired of being lead by old people.

Retired? Go retire. Please. You're done. Go retire. Let people who still have a life ahead of them with modern understandings with plenty of years ahead of them run.

Enough of out of touch geezers running stuff.

That said my local rep is my age and a complete dumpster fire retard (R), but hey, at least he's not 80. [rofl]
 

AFAR/PFAR

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The "elderly technophobes" gripe sounds like they're angling for Zoom rather than schlepping to Concord.

They're angling for all of the above and then some.

Zoom is useful in some instances, but if you've watched the last couple Senate sessions with Zoom they can't even get it right among 24 people. Imagine 400.
 

daekken

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This is the exact demographic age wise that is pretty much universally hated. One of the things that is ubiquitous is people sick and tired of being lead by old people.

Retired? Go retire. Please. You're done. Go retire. Let people who still have a life ahead of them with modern understandings with plenty of years ahead of them run.

Enough of out of touch geezers running stuff.

That said my local rep is my age and a complete dumpster fire retard (R), but hey, at least he's not 80. [rofl]
Interestingly, retiring is fairly common in other countries. Look at Merkel for instance, there's no term limits for German Chancellor, she could have kept going and going (elections aside), but stepped down now around our US retirement age. There's several world leaders under 40, like Marin in Finland (age 36).

Half of the Senate now, I believe, is 65+. And Congress is getting older, the average age is up something like four years since 2000.

Then you get the funny sound bites of Ted Stevens and his "my secretary sent me an internet the other day" and "series of tubes." Plus Blumenthal and his "commit to banning finsta" and so on.

We just incentivize politicians too much, so the urge to remain in power keeps going such that people want to die in office.
 

AFAR/PFAR

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This is the exact demographic age wise that is pretty much universally hated. One of the things that is ubiquitous is people sick and tired of being lead by old people.

Retired? Go retire. Please. You're done. Go retire. Let people who still have a life ahead of them with modern understandings with plenty of years ahead of them run.

Enough of out of touch geezers running stuff.

That said my local rep is my age and a complete dumpster fire retard (R), but hey, at least he's not 80. [rofl]


Yes, but unless you're independently wealthy, self employed with a flexible schedule, or receive tons of support from your employer, doing this as a wage slave isn't really possible.

The last thing we need are professional politicians.
 

Dench

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Interestingly, retiring is fairly common in other countries. Look at Merkel for instance, there's no term limits for German Chancellor, she could have kept going and going (elections aside), but stepped down now around our US retirement age. There's several world leaders under 40, like Marin in Finland (age 36).

Half of the Senate now, I believe, is 65+. And Congress is getting older, the average age is up something like four years since 2000.

Then you get the funny sound bites of Ted Stevens and his "my secretary sent me an internet the other day" and "series of tubes." Plus Blumenthal and his "commit to banning finsta" and so on.

We just incentivize politicians too much, so the urge to remain in power keeps going such that people want to die in office.

The "job" is certainly broken. And a lot of the people in those roles are there for their ego, which is 100% the WRONG reason to be the leader. This is the same trait that makes these people never want to retire. They live for their ego.

What people sub 50 need/want/see is going to be way different than what a person post 60 need/want/sees. A lot different. Having people who've already done it who have one foot in the grave run things is pretty silly, at least to me. Sure there are exceptions with people who are old who hold amazing talent, skill and intellect, but that's quite rare. The only old geezer I can think of who I really liked in the house was Ron Paul. At least he had the stones to hang it up and retire unlike the rest of these f***ing a**h***s.

Then again I could be going on wrong about it. As I mentioned my local rep is my age. Sub 40. He's also a (R) and from talking to him he's a fantastic talker, but full retard and seems to be unaware of how dumb he comes off when he's not directly in his wheelhouse. I brought a valid concern to his office in a subject I'm a defacto subject matter expert in. He agreed it was a scam (that the state is essentially running between private entities supported by targeted state law) and went on to say there was nothing he could do about it. Except there is. The problem is the system I'm bitching about has it's hooks directly in him and his peers financially. So he's bought and paid for. F these people. He's not there to fix things. He's the old fashioned Swamp Creature. Except he's a millennial.

Yes, but unless you're independently wealthy, self employed with a flexible schedule, or receive tons of support from your employer, doing this as a wage slave isn't really possible.

The last thing we need are professional politicians.
I 100% agree. it's a sad state of affairs.
 

design

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It is possible to work a full time job and concurrently be a state rep. I know several (more than 5) who are doing that now. These are not financially independent people. In at least 4 cases, they are also the primary [only?] income for the household.
It is all about priorities.
 

AFAR/PFAR

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Definitively takes some creative scheduling, but there is also the knowledge that not all of the year is slam packed with sessions like the two multi day house sessions recently or the almost weekly sessions going now. Also some committees are less busy than the others.

but yes, I suppose it can be done and it is about managing priorities
 

design

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Plan on 1 day a week and a few 2 days and 1 or 2 three day weeks. For those that work full time, those weeks with extra days comes out of vacation, but it can be done. The one day can be typically offset by working 4 (10's) the balance of the week
 

KBCraig

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Yes, but unless you're independently wealthy, self employed with a flexible schedule, or receive tons of support from your employer, doing this as a wage slave isn't really possible.
Between a small pension and a 30 hour part-time hourly job, my gross last year was $53,000 or so. That's our only household income.

My boss gives me flexibility in scheduling, but expects the same in return.

Keep in mind that I live two hours from Concord, so those back-to-back 12 hour days are killer. In four years, I only spent one night in Concord (gotta pay for your own room if you do).

So, yeah... not much sympathy here for the claim that you have to be wealthy. You should see some of the beaters in the parking garage.
 

42!

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Between a small pension and a 30 hour part-time hourly job, my gross last year was $53,000 or so. That's our only household income.

My boss gives me flexibility in scheduling, but expects the same in return.

Keep in mind that I live two hours from Concord, so those back-to-back 12 hour days are killer. In four years, I only spent one night in Concord (gotta pay for your own room if you do).

So, yeah... not much sympathy here for the claim that you have to be wealthy. You should see some of the beaters in the parking garage.
Forget wealth, you have a part time job with a flexible schedule, and a pension, and I assume no serious health issues. Now throw all that out and figure that you have to work over 40 hours a week with limited or no flexibility, no pension, your job is your sole income, and only a couple weeks PTO. Would it still be so easy? How are you going to work and attend sessions? Add in a health condition that requires several appointments each month and 3 hours every day, and has the side affect of leaving you exhausted. Doesn't sound so easy now does it.

It's not about money, I get paid well, I could handle a 10K pay cut if it got me the ability to serve as a Rep, but the industry doesn't work that way. You have to be available. Hell I took a 15K cut to move to NH, sure I got it back in a couple years, but the point is I'll cut when given the option to get what I want.

I'm glad you can server, it's a good thing. But most people are not in a position with that much flexibility and few other time commitments. Your situation is NOT typical.
 

AFAR/PFAR

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Between a small pension and a 30 hour part-time hourly job, my gross last year was $53,000 or so. That's our only household income.

My boss gives me flexibility in scheduling, but expects the same in return.

Keep in mind that I live two hours from Concord, so those back-to-back 12 hour days are killer. In four years, I only spent one night in Concord (gotta pay for your own room if you do).

So, yeah... not much sympathy here for the claim that you have to be wealthy. You should see some of the beaters in the parking garage.

Pretty sure, I did throw an "or" in there. ;)

but yeah, after watching that three day session last month, I was going to ask if the hotels were paid for. You answered that, do you get mileage for each day or only day 1 and day 3?

If they do pay mileage every day, it seems like a small fix IAW established per diem rates could be made for reps/sens whose district is X miles or hours away.
 

KBCraig

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Forget wealth, you have a part time job with a flexible schedule, and a pension, and I assume no serious health issues. Now throw all that out and figure that you have to work over 40 hours a week with limited or no flexibility, no pension, your job is your sole income, and only a couple weeks PTO. Would it still be so easy? How are you going to work and attend sessions? Add in a health condition that requires several appointments each month and 3 hours every day, and has the side affect of leaving you exhausted. Doesn't sound so easy now does it.

It's not about money, I get paid well, I could handle a 10K pay cut if it got me the ability to serve as a Rep, but the industry doesn't work that way. You have to be available. Hell I took a 15K cut to move to NH, sure I got it back in a couple years, but the point is I'll cut when given the option to get what I want.

I'm glad you can server, it's a good thing. But most people are not in a position with that much flexibility and few other time commitments. Your situation is NOT typical.
You moved the goalpost there quite a bit, but what the hell.

My own health is fair. No major issues. I'm not running again because of my wife's health. Two surgeries in 2021, two in 2022, diabetes, wound care appointments every two weeks... and they always seem to fall on Session Days. We only have one car, and she can't drive even if we had a second. That leaves her relying on local ride providers for cash.

Not everyone can juggle it, and I get that. I'm exhausted, which is why I'm taking a break.

State rep in NH is like coaching youth sports: everyone has to take a turn, whether they want to or not. The key is knowing how to give a, "Well, aren't you special?" smile to those in the stands screaming at how you're doing it all wrong.
 

KBCraig

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but yeah, after watching that three day session last month, I was going to ask if the hotels were paid for. You answered that, do you get mileage for each day or only day 1 and day 3?

If they do pay mileage every day, it seems like a small fix IAW established per diem rates could be made for reps/sens whose district is X miles or hours away.
Mileage is paid from your home to the State House on days you actually attend (including committee meetings). It's paid at the IRS rate, which is set once a year (it went down slightly right before fuel prices shot up).

Reps aren't supposed to claim mileage unless they travel from home. It's on the honor system. The one time I stayed in Concord, I gave up two legs of mileage (total $118.97), and paid the $140 hotel room out of pocket.

Meals are always on your own, unless a group is providing a meal for free. TANSTAAFL
 

42!

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You moved the goalpost there quite a bit, but what the hell.

My own health is fair. No major issues. I'm not running again because of my wife's health. Two surgeries in 2021, two in 2022, diabetes, wound care appointments every two weeks... and they always seem to fall on Session Days. We only have one car, and she can't drive even if we had a second. That leaves her relying on local ride providers for cash.

Not everyone can juggle it, and I get that. I'm exhausted, which is why I'm taking a break.

State rep in NH is like coaching youth sports: everyone has to take a turn, whether they want to or not. The key is knowing how to give a, "Well, aren't you special?" smile to those in the stands screaming at how you're doing it all wrong.
"You moved the goalpost there quite a bit, but what the hell." Didn't mean to, not really sure how you mean this, but not my intent.

My overall point was while getting involved takes sacrifice and that both can be done and if often a good thing, but there is no absolute in that it's just a matter of priorities. Sometimes the situation is just too far gone and the sacrifice would be everything, and the choice ends up being not doing A or attempting and failing at A. No exaggeration, as long as I work I can get treatment and keep a roof over my head, if I keep this going I'll live long enough to get a transplant, giving me a lifespan near normal, several decades. Break that cycle and my life is measured in months. This has only been the situation for less than a year, so maybe I'm a little sensitive when I hear it's just a matter of setting priorities. So maybe I overreact a bit.

Remember, this is something I want to do, but can't. Before I moved up here I was pretty active locally, I held both elected and appointed positions in my town in MA and had every intent of continuing that trend with more involvement. But when the time came I couldn't keep my word and do it. I'm pissed off with the situation and myself. If you're not part of the solution you're part of the problem. And I find I can't be part of the solution right now.

You contributed, and you need a break. It's well deserved and we all should be thankful, maybe you come back. It was a smaller scale but I know how some act toward elected representatives. Framingham had 264 elected town meeting reps, I think there were 3 that weren't super liberals, including myself, we got to hear about it if we questioned the simplest of initiatives. I can only imagine how it would be for you on the state level.

You earned a break. And I wish the best for your wife.
 

AFAR/PFAR

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Mileage is paid from your home to the State House on days you actually attend (including committee meetings). It's paid at the IRS rate, which is set once a year (it went down slightly right before fuel prices shot up).

Reps aren't supposed to claim mileage unless they travel from home. It's on the honor system. The one time I stayed in Concord, I gave up two legs of mileage (total $118.97), and paid the $140 hotel room out of pocket.

Well at least you have that going for you. If it was something dumb like the Army, they would pay first and last day mileage while claiming the bus station is the lodging they provided. 🙃
 

AFAR/PFAR

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So on the subject, what is the count of the Senators moving on? I think we had a discussion earlier, but I can't find it. Looks like a bunch of potential transition in the 24 member body and the obvious ripple in the larger body.

Rs:
Hennessey--retire. Endorsed Ms Gendreau(Littleton BoS and per the article deep family ties to Littleton). Also running is R Rep Merner and D rep Tucker. Add in Rep Thompson from Stewartstown as another R.
Guida--retire. Endorsed Rep Lang also running is Mr DeVoy
French--retire. Rep Pearl running
Morse--US Senate campaign

Ds:
Sherman--NH Governor campaign

Who am I missing?
 
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Bt74

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They're angling for all of the above and then some.

Zoom is useful in some instances, but if you've watched the last couple Senate sessions with Zoom they can't even get it right among 24 people. Imagine 400.
Why does Jeffery Toobin come to mind?
 
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