Rifle Sling suggestions / help

Laderbuilt

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I am going to be giving my son his first rifle for his birthday.
It is a Henry Youth in .22. Which was purchased thru a group buy here a while back 😁. As my title says I need suggestions / help for a sling.

I have considered the “Brass Tacker” it is very nice but I don’t think it will hold up to a 10yr old boy new to his first rifle.
Concern mainly comes from its tube clamp design. Now I have one of these and it is nice in looks and does the job for me but I don’t consider it “robust”. Beyond that the only other sling I have is for an AR so my experience and knowledge is LIMITED.

Requirement in a sling.
1: Quality
2: Can stand up to “ youth abuse” from material to attachment method
3: Pleasing to the eye
4: Functional.

I am open to suggestions as well as possible places to do a high quality install if need be

So I hope I can expand my knowledge base with the help of the folks here on NES.

Thanks for your time and help
 

KMM696

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If I'm understanding correctly, your concern is that the tube mounted sling swivel won't hold up to a 10 year old? I suppose you could mount a machine screw sling swivel like Grovtec's up front, but I have no idea if the fore end wood on a Henry will hold up any better than a tube mount swivel. Don't own one, you see - I'd be concerned with how thick the wood is where the screw would go through, and how solid the handguard attaches to the rifle. It might be worth calling up Henry and asking if they've heard of or seen any failures of the tube mounted swivels like they offer; and ask what they think of mounting in the front handguard.

I'm also a fan of the old USGI cotton sling. That STI one linked by wiryone1 above looks good, too.
 

Laderbuilt

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If I'm understanding correctly, your concern is that the tube mounted sling swivel won't hold up to a 10 year old? I suppose you could mount a machine screw sling swivel like Grovtec's up front, but I have no idea if the fore end wood on a Henry will hold up any better than a tube mount swivel. Don't own one, you see - I'd be concerned with how thick the wood is where the screw would go through, and how solid the handguard attaches to the rifle. It might be worth calling up Henry and asking if they've heard of or seen any failures of the tube mounted swivels like they offer; and ask what they think of mounting in the front handguard.

I'm also a fan of the old USGI cotton sling. That STI one linked by wiryone1 above looks good, too.
Thank for reading thru my gibberish. Yes that’s one of my concerns.

I have never mounted a sling besides the two mentioned.
The AR was already prepped from factory for a sling so that one was straight forward. And the brass tack one I got because I felt it completed the “look” of my rifle I was after while offering some utility as well.
I am green, new, ignorant, etc to slings (however I am trying to learn) and I want to give my son a rifle with a sling on it so when he gets my age he won’t be ignorant like me.
As well as share the knowledge I learn on how to use a sling with him.

So I don’t know the best way to attach a sling even more so on
 

Laderbuilt

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In general, I don't like any sling that has any stretch and/or padding.


I like that mount setup. Seems rugged. However I wouldn’t install my self for reasons.

anyone know of a good Smith in the Worcester area that can do something like that?
 

enbloc

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In regards to @pupchow's video, (and not related to OP's question... ) I will start a swivel hole in finished wood stocks by using the drill in reverse, and only boring in about 1/8 to 3/16 inches
then continue drilling with bit rotating in correct direction. This process has greatly reduced wood "break-out" and chipping. (Still use masking tape and pilot holes too...)

Nothing worse than ruining a beautiful walnut stock...
 
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