Supreme Court - NYSRPA v. Bruen - Megathread

crispnipz

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Im sorry, but i really do not think this ruling will effect anything in MA. Heller and Mcdonald were supposed to guarantee a handgun in the home for self defense, but MA can still deny you for suitability and the courts will uphold the denial for most Appeals. MA will still continue to do what they do, save for a fare few that may slip thru. This ruling will not eliminate suitability or restrictions In MA. Period
Very much disagree, although it won't be immediate and they will play some BS game like they did with Caetano. MA most certainly had its hand forced in Caetano, but it wasn't immediate, the result was positive.
 

inkdesigner

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MA most certainly had its hand forced in Caetano, but it wasn't immediate, the result was positive.

Was it really positive though? You still need an FID for a handheld stun weapon and a LTC for a stun gun. So, to own one, you are still at the whim of the LO and suitability. Also, stun guns are subject to the same laws and regulations as handguns, so a stun gun technically needs to stored on your person, with a trigger lock (which can't be done), or in a safe
 

microwave900

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Just because they might not be able to deny you a license or restrict it doesn't mean they can't use the Commonwealth's Red Flag law to make you a prohibited person. I fully expect shitbird PDs to come up with every excuse to make people "unsuitable" by other legal machinations even if SCotUS gets rid of "May Issue" & "suitability"
I was thinking this the other day. Even if issuance is shall-issue, that’s no big deal for 90% of ma**h***s who already just get the license when they apply. The issue is once you have the license, how can they take it away? Red flag laws would have to go, along with any other way that a license can be unilaterally yanked. And needing an LTC to possess not just to carry means a loss of license is still very consequential.

Im sorry, but i really do not think this ruling will effect anything in MA. Heller and Mcdonald were supposed to guarantee a handgun in the home for self defense, but MA can still deny you for suitability and the courts will uphold the denial for most Appeals. MA will still continue to do what they do, save for a fare few that may slip thru. This ruling will not eliminate suitability or restrictions In MA. Period
There’s that long-running court case where the state has argued that a Permit To Purchase plus FID is sufficient to satisfy Heller. If that case ever ends we might actually have Heller honored. So maybe fifteen years after this decision the state will stop fighting it. Often the state/local government organizations don’t want to fight lawsuit after lawsuit, we’ve seen it with LTC restrictions and maybe we can wear them down with a future ruling in our pocket.
 

Dennis in MA

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The ruling will allow regulations but it will make the remaining 8 states shall issue basically

I could see one SNAFU on this. (Why don't people capitalize that word???)

Licensing goes to SP in some manner. Limited access to renew and such. Just a general hassle for citizens. Because there is no more NEED for the city/town to be involved.
 

Dennis in MA

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Sally Parker. She's that nice clerk. LOL

Could you imagine you have to go to one of the 18 or so (guessing) barracks to get your license renewed. You and every other person in your AO? There'd be a line out the door every day of the week. And what do you do when that lic. officer is on his mandatory 4-6 weeks vacation per year? Licensing could grind to a halt.

Not to say I DON'T want the USSC to rule in our favor. I could foresee some terrible Massholian snapback though.
 

Mesatchornug

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Sally Parker. She's that nice clerk. LOL

Could you imagine you have to go to one of the 18 or so (guessing) barracks to get your license renewed. You and every other person in your AO? There'd be a line out the door every day of the week. And what do you do when that lic. officer is on his mandatory 4-6 weeks vacation per year? Licensing could grind to a halt.

Not to say I DON'T want the USSC to rule in our favor. I could foresee some terrible Massholian snapback though.
I've got to ask - why do you keep referring to SCOTUS as USSC?
 

Waher

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Sure.
Except it's the Supreme Court of the United States, thus it is called SCOTUS, e.g. the title of this thread, scotusblog, etc.
SCOTUS became popular parlance when POTUS started getting used (mid 2000s?). Prior to that the abbreviation commonly used was USSC. Or at least that's the way I remember it.
/1980s kid
 

milktree

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SCOTUS became popular parlance when POTUS started getting used (mid 2000s?). Prior to that the abbreviation commonly used was USSC. Or at least that's the way I remember it.
/1980s kid

I’d bet a pizza that The West Wing had a significant part in popularizing the use of POTUS.

The West Wing started in 1999.
 

cathouse01

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SCOTUS became popular parlance when POTUS started getting used (mid 2000s?). Prior to that the abbreviation commonly used was USSC. Or at least that's the way I remember it.
/1980s kid
From Merriam-Webster:
The earliest recorded use any variant of -OTUS is from 1879, when SCOTUS (Supreme Court of the United States) appeared in a book titled The Phillips Telegraphic Code for the Rapid Transmission by Telegraph. This work, by Walter P. Phillips, was one of a large number of code books which allowed people to send inexpensive or secret messages via telegraph. Telegraphs were priced based on length, so one wanted to use as few words as possible. SCOTUS appeared between the abbreviations for scoundrel (scndrl) and scribble (scribl).
 

Jason Flare

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