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My daughter has an article in Jan-Feb Military Review.

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Check out article From Heaven to Hell: Fires Employment for the 11th Airborne Division “Arctic Angels”

Military Review 2024 Print Archives

She is one tough women. I'm so proud to be her dad.

She has a command and I have no idea they have the time to even do half of that article along with the day-to-day ops.

I believe they are out training right now, haven't heard from her in while.

Nice article. I skimmed it, but it looks good. And to think, @Dench says airborne forces are obsolete...

ATW!
 
That’s awesome! Amazing photos in that article.
Pass on doing helicopter hookup in the Arctic. 😂

It is not uncommon for a hook-up team to experience temperatures below -50oF during hook-up procedures under rotor wash.
 
A concise, well thought out and critical article, below is one takeout that I thought interesting. Congratulations on your daughter she sounds like a real professional

"Recommendations for the future: A perhaps more pressing issue precedes these challenges: neither Army nor Department of Defense program managers are mandated to conduct extreme cold-weather testing for new equipment in Alaska. This oversight leads to the deployment of equipment ill-suited for Arctic conditions."
 
Airborne! You did good Dad.
I know she was testing for that, but i dont think she is in yet.
She has just been there a year and had to straighten out a few bad situations that one should not deal with as an officer.
All on top of training and getting tested yourself, having the troops trained, troops changed out and being replaced and going on maneuvers with inadequate equipment.
Things like just enough trucks to get the required equipment to the battle location, but none for troops.
Sorry guys half of you have to walk.
 
I know she was testing for that, but i dont think she is in yet.
She has just been there a year and had to straighten out a few bad situations that one should not deal with as an officer.
All on top of training and getting tested yourself, having the troops trained, troops changed out and being replaced and going on maneuvers with inadequate equipment.
Things like just enough trucks to get the required equipment to the battle location, but none for troops.
Sorry guys half of you have to walk.
Well you still did good raising her up. And suffering while walking long distances in horrible weather with a big green tick on your back builds character. Trucks and sunshine are a crutch. lol
 
That’s awesome! Amazing photos in that article.
Pass on doing helicopter hookup in the Arctic. 😂

It is not uncommon for a hook-up team to experience temperatures below -50oF during hook-up procedures under rotor wash.
Did you see that photo of the helo frozen in the ice.
Alaska is crazy. mid summer is 80 degrees and swampy,buggy lets say august. October snow on the ground and doesn't melt. the 3 months after that its -50.

Its like another planet.
 
Check out article From Heaven to Hell: Fires Employment for the 11th Airborne Division “Arctic Angels”

Military Review 2024 Print Archives

She is one tough women. I'm so proud to be her dad.

She has a command and I have no idea they have the time to even do half of that article along with the day-to-day ops.

I believe they are out training right now, haven't heard from her in while.

They are out in the field for JPMRC...from what my son told me, they have a bunch of Mongolian and Canadian troops training with them.
 
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Well you still did good raising her up. And suffering while walking long distances in horrible weather with a big green tick on your back builds character. Trucks and sunshine are a crutch. lol
no is worse than that, cant even leave the base. Your going to train 100 miles away in some range and tell the guys to walk out the front gate and will give you a couple of days to get to the range/area. What about real deal and need to go across the state. I guess some of them can use their POV to a point if need for a real war.
and yes they dont just drive up with everything and unload. I have a picture were the gun was driven it but they snow shoed in.

They have been training and she has been having fun with cross country skiing for PT.
She and the group have been running a competition with her guys and ranks and pushing the outdoor ski/shoe.
She uses army issue skis and likes to kick butt even though they are slower and you can use regular ones for PT.
She has the advantage, she was using "split boards" to hike and board the alps for many years.
a split board is a snow board that splits into two skis that you use more like cross country skis if you need to. used traverse long trails then snow board the powder stuff to go down like a boarder. and you have snow shoes, and avalanche gear.
She was on a guided trip in the mountains between Romania/Ukraine the week Russa invaded Ukraine.
 
me too. looking for the cliffsnotes and movie to come out.
They were behind and are starting from scratch to rebuild.
Their equipment doesn't work when its really cold.
Training materials have not kept up for the environment.
and they dont have what they need to do the mission.

thats my take
 
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They were behind and are starting from scratch to rebuild.
There equipment doesn't work when its really cold.
Training materials have not kept up for the environment.
and they dont have what they need to do the mission.

thats my take

We've never been all that great in the cold. We stopgapped during the Cold War with some specialized scouts from the Alaska National Guard, a lot of Air Force surveillance, and making sure we had a good relationship with the Canadians.

We tried, with the 1st SSF and the 10th Mountain in WWII, but in general "fighting in the arctic" has never really been a US priority.
 
We've never been all that great in the cold. We stopgapped during the Cold War with some specialized scouts from the Alaska National Guard, a lot of Air Force surveillance, and making sure we had a good relationship with the Canadians.

We tried, with the 1st SSF and the 10th Mountain in WWII, but in general "fighting in the arctic" has never really been a US priority.

They are definitely trying to change that, and taking the Arctic seriously...finally.


View: https://www.instagram.com/p/C3IZDTTr_6E/
 
They were behind and are starting from scratch to rebuild.
There equipment doesn't work when its really cold.
Training materials have not kept up for the environment.
and they dont have what they need to do the mission.

thats my take
We've never been all that great in the cold. We stopgapped during the Cold War with some specialized scouts from the Alaska National Guard, a lot of Air Force surveillance, and making sure we had a good relationship with the Canadians.

We tried, with the 1st SSF and the 10th Mountain in WWII, but in general "fighting in the arctic" has never really been a US priority.
@powerman I read this book last summer. Some great info about what it takes to fight in the cold and snow. It tells the story of how they formed the 10th Mtn Div in WWII at Camp Hale in Colorado relying upon civilian skiers and transplanted European alpinists.
It may or may not be of use to your daughter and her unit - either way it’s a great read.
IMG_0904.jpeg
 
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We've never been all that great in the cold. We stopgapped during the Cold War with some specialized scouts from the Alaska National Guard, a lot of Air Force surveillance, and making sure we had a good relationship with the Canadians.

We tried, with the 1st SSF and the 10th Mountain in WWII, but in general "fighting in the arctic" has never really been a US priority.
That’s a depressing assessment of our military and 2024 WTF is is everybody brain dead
 
That’s a depressing assessment of our military and 2024 WTF is is everybody brain dead

I mean, to be fair, it's not really a miscalculation. We've fought in subzero temps before, but not all that often. And even during the height of the Cold War, it was pretty clear that a winter war in Alaska was never really going to happen.

I'd say that, in a world without unlimited training time and budgets, where you have to spend what training time you do have on the highest-probability scenarios, it makes sense to put fewer resources into the Arctic. I doubt our adversaries prioritize it any more than we do.
 
I mean, to be fair, it's not really a miscalculation. We've fought in subzero temps before, but not all that often. And even during the height of the Cold War, it was pretty clear that a winter war in Alaska was never really going to happen.

I'd say that, in a world without unlimited training time and budgets, where you have to spend what training time you do have on the highest-probability scenarios, it makes sense to put fewer resources into the Arctic. I doubt our adversaries prioritize it any more than we do.
Bro, his daughter is doing military analysis of the current situation in Alaska to think this is not on anybody’s war plan is simply delusional. Yeah, we’re sending billions of dollars & munitions to the yuk’s But let’s take care of our own shit first
 
Bro, his daughter is doing military analysis of the current situation in Alaska to think this is not on anybody’s war plan is simply delusional. Yeah, we’re sending billions of dollars & munitions to the yuk’s But let’s take care of our own shit first

Yes, bro. I read the article. I liked it.

We've had an airborne task force in Alaska for decades. The idea wasn't that they'd fight in Alaska, any more than the idea was that the 82d would fight in North Carolina or the 173rd would fight in Italy. They're forward-deployed for a jump into an Asian hotspot.

And, as long as they're there? Why not train in the winter a little bit, just in case they have to jump into Korea.
 
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