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What is your "Long Range" Rifle Platform?

Fair question. It’s recommended to zero parallel to your optic sight line. So it would be zeroed offset by a few inches with your optic. Then at distance you check range at the center of the crosshairs.

If you’re dialing rather than holding, make sure the scope is at your zero stop when ranging, before dialing. These are admittedly easier to use when holding instead of dialing.

Can’t count the number of times I’ve forgotten to dial down and f***ed it up because of that.

Interesting. Sounds like a lot of work to dial down, look, dial again ... unless you are always holding and not touching the elevation.
 
Do you have a spare rifle and ammo I can use ?

I just sold a chassis and stock to fund a new Foundation order so I’m currently down to one stock. If I can locate a chassis/stock for a r700 I should be able to get something together.
 
How beginner friendly are these matches?
I'll echo what @lukewarm_fuzz has stated, you won't find a better group of individuals IMO. The last club match we had in November was full of new shooters. I shoot with Tony, the match director for this match, quite a bit and he is an awesome dude. He has stated this match will be very beginner friendly with generous targets. There may or may not be a few little ones for the seasoned guys. 🤫

There will be plenty of guys/girls there willing to help out and let you try equipment, all you gotta do is ask.
 
Glad Granby is getting things sorted again, just sad I’m not around to see it and still shoot there.

The 2k range near me closed down to build houses. =\
 
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Thanks! I’m always leery about matches that are supposedly friendly to new shooters. Had a few experiences where they weren’t so friendly. Glad to hear yours is!
If your back can handle bending into peculiar positions fine. :)
People are fine, but the issue at granby for me was - it is intimidating as you have to be prepared mentally to memorize the sequence of shots and be able to locate where those targets are that you supposed to shoot. Make sure to bring your own clear enough binoculars with a tripod, there will be some there but to have your own are better. Distances to targets will be provided.

When you miss the target it is very difficult to see at granby where shot lands, can be easier now with less greenery around but still, can be difficult.

People around will not speak much as it is still a competition, but will provide you spotting if requested.

Again, core trick is to scan those 50 or whatnot targets maze, memorize where they are, then write down dopes and sequence of how many shots to what targets you need to do. Kinda a lot of fun, if, again, you can still to bend into a fetus position at lower height without pain. :)
 
If your back can handle bending into peculiar positions fine. :)
People are fine, but the issue at granby for me was - it is intimidating as you have to be prepared mentally to memorize the sequence of shots and be able to locate where those targets are that you supposed to shoot. Make sure to bring your own clear enough binoculars with a tripod, there will be some there but to have your own are better. Distances to targets will be provided.

When you miss the target it is very difficult to see at granby where shot lands, can be easier now with less greenery around but still, can be difficult.

People around will not speak much as it is still a competition, but will provide you spotting if requested.

Again, core trick is to scan those 50 or whatnot targets maze, memorize where they are, then write down dopes and sequence of how many shots to what targets you need to do. Kinda a lot of fun, if, again, you can still to bend into a fetus position at lower height without pain. :)
You’ve touched on some of the key challenges in every PRS match not just Granby.

These matches aren’t decided by the gun. The people who are successful are the ones which make the least amount of mistakes on the clock.

Knowing the course of fire for the stage as well target locations is the first part. Having some type of dope card in which you can write notes to help you through the stage is very important.

Target acquisition is also extremely important. Knowing before you start exactly where each target is. I usually try to find unique landmarks for each target, this will aid in quicker acquisition on the clock.

Believe it or not Granby’s target array is one of the easier to navigate in this area. I recommend the newer shooters start at lower magnification I.e. 10-12x especially if having a hard time locating targets.

Spotting your shots can be hard at first but it’s also critical in making corrections. Without knowing where your rounds are going it’s hard to make corrections. Not every range has clearcut berms which make spotting misses easy.

Again this is just a fun club match there are no points to be had. Yes we can be competitive but I cannot name one person that’s not willing to lend a hand to a new shooter. As a group we are trying to grow the sport as well as the offerings at this range.

Biggest thing is you gotta ask. Most of us aren’t going to go making suggestions unless someone wants our help. Nobody likes that guy at the range that just comes up and tells you you gotta do it their way.

My last suggestion is to come in open minded with no expectations of winning. I don’t care how good a shooter is this can be a humbling experience if not done before. I know it was for me.

I guarantee these matches will test you in areas most would never think of and in the end is going to make you a more rounded marksman.

Please reach out if anyone’s got questions!
 
My last suggestion is to come in open minded with no expectations of winning. I don’t care how good a shooter is this can be a humbling experience if not done before. I know it was for me.

I guarantee these matches will test you in areas most would never think of and in the end is going to make you a more rounded marksman.
If you don’t compete, you’re overestimating your own proficiency. No way around it!

These granby club matches are the best. Such a good atmosphere, just a fun time, nobody cares about the score.
 
Just for comparison here is Sheepdog Warrior in NY. I would say the number of targets have increased roughly 50% since this picture. IMG_6011.png
If you don’t compete, you’re overestimating your own proficiency. No way around it!

These granby club matches are the best. Such a good atmosphere, just a fun time, nobody cares about the score.
Tony gonna let you run the XC for this match?🫣 😂
 
I remember when I left active duty and tried my hand at CMP Service Rifle matches. I was always one of the better shooters in my unit. Then I went to compete and got humbled. 😆

That sounds like when our ROTC team got our clock cleaned by a bunch of farmers back in college. We thought we were hot shit and they smoked us without breaking a sweat
 
How beginner friendly are these matches?
I'm going to make a blanket statement.

Go to any match. Check your ego at the door. Announce to everyone that you are new at this and pretty much everyone will bend over backwards to help you.

At the smith and Wesson winter IDPA nationals around 1998 I was squadded with Ernie Langdon, Al Zeta (a local legend) and Ken Hackathorne. They were brutal competitors with respect to each other.
But they worked together to coach me through my first IDPA match. They even loaned me a Surefire for the flashlight stages, since I brought a MagLight with me to the match. Ha.
 
You’ve touched on some of the key challenges in every PRS match not just Granby.

These matches aren’t decided by the gun. The people who are successful are the ones which make the least amount of mistakes on the clock.

Knowing the course of fire for the stage as well target locations is the first part. Having some type of dope card in which you can write notes to help you through the stage is very important.

Target acquisition is also extremely important. Knowing before you start exactly where each target is. I usually try to find unique landmarks for each target, this will aid in quicker acquisition on the clock.

Believe it or not Granby’s target array is one of the easier to navigate in this area. I recommend the newer shooters start at lower magnification I.e. 10-12x especially if having a hard time locating targets.

Spotting your shots can be hard at first but it’s also critical in making corrections. Without knowing where your rounds are going it’s hard to make corrections. Not every range has clearcut berms which make spotting misses easy.

Again this is just a fun club match there are no points to be had. Yes we can be competitive but I cannot name one person that’s not willing to lend a hand to a new shooter. As a group we are trying to grow the sport as well as the offerings at this range.

Biggest thing is you gotta ask. Most of us aren’t going to go making suggestions unless someone wants our help. Nobody likes that guy at the range that just comes up and tells you you gotta do it their way.

My last suggestion is to come in open minded with no expectations of winning. I don’t care how good a shooter is this can be a humbling experience if not done before. I know it was for me.

I guarantee these matches will test you in areas most would never think of and in the end is going to make you a more rounded marksman.

Please reach out if anyone’s got questions!

dunno, i did 2 matches now and not sure if will do more, as i can see - shooting on the clock just does not seem to be what i like. you never know before you try. may be some 22lr ones. will see.

it is a fun sport for sure, but i just prefer to take my time now, i guess i am turning into a benchrest shooter type, probably. not if anything was wrong with that.

talking about tips - i noticed a thing one guy was doing - i think it is a useful tip sortof - he had a painter tape and was putting pieces of it on his arm and writing on it the actual sequence of the shots per each stage with a simplified map of where targets were.
dope card is easier to deal with for actual dopes/drops, but the sequence of targets and how many shots per each target was an interesting challenge to deal with.

it takes its time to figure out the routine, i guess, if one really likes shooting on timer, which is the core key of the whole exercise there.
the older i get - the more antisocial i get, so, the idea of participating in any sort of a collective activity gets less and less attractive to me, but, to each his own.

i got caught on the magnification thing also, as under stress you just forget to unzoom the scope to 10x or 16x, before getting into the far away target, and on 24x you cannot really find next target in the maze. granby config did not seem simple but if it was - well, it is good to know. an interesting topic in itself.

everything is fine, people are fine, most know what they do and are really there to just do it, not to talk. which is perfectly understandable.
and what matters - in the middle of the stage there is no time to talk to no one nor ask anything, as whole thing rolls fast, so the first time for anyone will be confusing no matter what, as you cannot ask much about things you know nothing about. second one is fine.

as of gear wise - some well organized bag is a must, to be able to pull things out and put them back quickly, into proper spots. more than 2 mags, pre-loaded would also help, but not critical. and a belt or some other system - velcro or molle etc - on you to avoid a moronic problem of how to carry a rifle and 4 other things in 2 hands you got, then pull chamber flag out while holding all that.

that chamber flag idiocy is really the most stupid part of the whole routine, but, whatever.
 
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So I’m getting back to going to PRS matches again. I’ve been dry firing off the barricade etc in basement with very focused practice, and concluded that I’ve improved enough since my first matches that running a more traditional stock was now holding me back. This became very apparent when trying the new barricade stage (recently changed for this year). Same time for stage, but now 5 positions instead of four, 10 shots instead of 8 and while target still at 400 yards, instead of 10” target it is now a 8” and 6” close to each other and you have one shot at each from each position. Anyhow that’s how I justified buying my first chassis. Before and after pics below.

Staying with my frugal attitude, I went with one of least expensive ones. (Aero precision Solus chassis, caught a sale $533 delivered). Pleased with it so far.

I had back to back practice runs last night where I estimated 9 out of 10 and 10 for 10 in about 86 or 87 sec. vast improvement.
 

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